US XIX Corps, Across the Siegfried Line, October 1944

NARA-292569

XIXCorps-US-WW2This study is a General Staff analysis and record of the most important operational details of the XIX Corps’ successful attack on and penetration through the Siegfried Line. This successful attack against the Siegfried Line should be treated largely as a tribute to the superb fighting ability of our infantry and armored soldiers, well supported by artillery and engineers, intelligently led in a well-planned action. It has demonstrated that thorough planning, determined leadership and aggressiveness in battle, can overcome what otherwise seems to be insuperable obstacles. Both, the 30th Infantry Division and the 2nd Armored Division were battle experienced with able leadership throughout their echelons. The 29th Infantry Division, which came in during the latter phases of the operation, was also a battle experienced Division. The 30-ID had been continually in contact with the enemy since its first attack on June 15 1944 on the Vire & Taute Canal (France); it had participated in the breakthrough south of St Lô; and had withstood the German Panzer attack near Mortain in their effort to recapture Avranches. It had fought across France and Belgium, capturing Tournai and Fort Eben Emael; and was the first American unit to enter Holland then entered Germany in September to prepare for this assault on the Siegfried Line. Its Commander, Maj Gen Leland S. Hobbs, had commanded the Division from its initial commitment; its Assistant Division Commander, Artillery Commander, and other higher commanders, were all experienced and battle tried. It was a well-developed team.

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B-17 Bomber Year & Serial (1941)

Here's a fun tribute to the brave airmen of the US Army Air Forces during World War 2 with Elizabeth. The US Army Air Force was the air power might of World War 2, dropping millions of pounds of ordnance over Europe and Japan and changing the tide of the war. Elizabeth is wearing an enlisted Class A uniform and crusher cap, behind her is the famed Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress. Model: Elizabeth Photographer: Britt Dietz © Dietz Dolls: [link]

Here’s a nice Tribute to the Brave Airmen of the WW-2 USAAF
The USAAF was the air power might of World War 2, dropping millions of pounds of ordnance over Europe and Japan and changing the tide of the war. Elizabeth is wearing an enlisted Class A uniform and crusher cap, behind her is the famed Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress.
(Source = Model : Elizabeth; Photographer : Britt Dietz © Dietz Dolls dietzdolls.com)

B-17G Specifications
First flight : July 28, 1935 (prototype)
Model number : 299
Classification : Bomber
Span : 103 feet 9 inches
Length : 74 feet 9 inches
Gross weight : 65,000 pounds
Top speed : 287 mph
Cruising speed : 150 mph
Range (max.) : 3,750 miles
Ceiling : 35,600 feet
Power : Four 1200-horsepower Wright R-1820-97 engines
Accommodation : 2 pilots, bombardier, radio-operator, 5 gunners
Armament : 11 to 13 machine guns, 9,600-pound bomb load

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1st Canadian Parachute Battalion – United Kingdom to France

67Report N°138
Historical Officier
Canadian Military Headquarters

1st Canadian Parachute Battalion
Organization and Training
July 1942 – June 1944

Canada’s first specially trained parachute unit was the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion; it did not have the status of a regiment though is considered a direct predecessor to The Canadian Airborne Regiment. The Battalion was formed during the Second World War and disbanded shortly after; it served concurrently with the 1st Canadian Special Service Battalion, the administrative name for the Canadian component of the First Special Service Force. Unlike its counterpart in the US Army, the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion was entirely Canadian, and though it had a Canadian commanding officer, was assigned to the 6th British Airborne Division throughout combat employment and thus was not under higher Canadian command.

(1) Background to the Formation of the Unit (November 1940 – July 1942)
(2) Formation and Early Training (July 1942 – July 1943)
(3) Incorporation in the British 6th Airborne Division
(4) Arrival in the United Kingdom (July 28 1943)
(5) Legal Relationship to British Formation
(6) Administrative Arrangements
(7) Training in the United Kingdom (August 1943 – February 1944)
(8) 1st Canadian Parachute Training Company
(9) Mobilization and Preparations for D Day (March 1944 – June 1944)

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