24-ID, Mindanao, April – August 1945

Operations of the 24th Infantry Division in the invasion of Midanao (with Emphasis on G-1 Activities), Philippine Islands, April 17 – August 11 1945, (Personal Experience of a Division General Staff Officer), (Assistant Division G-1 and Subsequently Division G-1), Lt Col Robert J. Daniels

This personal experience monograph covers the operations of the 24th Infantry Division in the Invasion of Mindanao Island, Philippine Islands, during the period of 17 April 1945 to 11 August 1945 with particular emphasis being placed on the G-1 activities of the Division General Staff. The division operation, commencing with an amphibious assault developed initially into a highly mobile situation with later phases being involved with a hard slow-moving battle. A study of this operation is believed to be of special interest to military students as it affords an opportunity to study an independent infantry division action which was an infrequent situation in World War II.

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Provisional OSS Plat. in Night Recon (Arakan Coast) Burma (1944/1945)

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(Photos NARA, Site : Paperless EUCMH)

Provisional OSS Platoon in Night Reconnaissance
Arakan Coast, Burma, October 1944 through April 1945
India – Burma Campaign
Capt Martin J. Waters, Jr., Infantry
Co author : Douglas L. Waters (son of Martin “Joe” Waters)
Operation Type : Amphibious Landing by Units of Platoon Strength, or less, for Purposes or Limited Reconnaissance.

Below is a picture of my father after the siege at N’Phum Ga, Maggott Hill. He was the OSS (Office of Strategic Services) officer attached to the 2-Bn, Blue Co, I&R (reconnaissance) Platoon of the Merrill’s Marauders, 5307-C-(P). This was prior to the Amphibious missions on the Arakan coast with the British commandos. They were surrounded by the Japanese and greatly outnumbered and held on for two weeks until relief came. They were bonsai charged every day and received artillery rounds from the Japs constantly. The Platoon leader became a psychological casualty and remained speechless in his foxhole during most of the siege. My father took over command of the platoon and even though his men wanted to surrender he kept them going, sometimes with threat of a .45 ACP. If the men surrendered he knew the Japs would have killed everyone. Below is the citation for the action and a happier time back in the US after Burma (he’s the big guy in the middle with the tan waistcoat)

Martin-Joe-Waters
(Photo Douglas L. Waters)

Citation
First Lieutenant Martin J. Waters 0-454133, Cavalry, Army of the United States is awarded the Bronze Star Medal for meritorious service during the period of February 19, 1944 to April 16, 1944. During this period Lt Waters was attached to an Intelligence and Reconnaissance (I&R) Platoon of the 5307 Composite Unit (Provisional) and proceeded the march of the unit by 24 hours in all engagements. Lt Waters marched over 300 miles through enemy occupied territory and participated in 3 battles : Walabum, Shaduzup, Inkangayawng. Wen the platoon leader became a casualty during a 14 days the I&R platoon was surrounded at Maggot Hill, Lt Waters took command and due to his leadership and initiative, the platoon was able to hold on until relief came.

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Birth of the Elite, 1940, 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion

Canadian-Para-Wing

Appendix A Historical Section
Canadian Military Headquarter Report #138
Further Material Relating to the Organization and Training of the
1st Canadian Parachute Battalion

(40) This appendix supplement the information contained in those sections of Report N°138 which deal with the background, the formation and the early training of the 1-CPB. The chief sources of information have been the relevant files at A.H.G. Other material consulted included the War Diary of General A.G.L. McNaughton, various directorate diaries at A.H.Q, and the unit War Diary. For convenience in reference, the paragraphs are numbered consecutively with those of Report N°138.

Background to Formation of the Unit
(41) Although the memorandum prepared by Colonel Burns in November 1940 was the first to be brought to attention of the Overseas authorities (para #3/1-CPB/UK to Combat), that officer had put forward similar proposals 3 months earlier, Aug 13. This earlier memorandum was examined by Colonel (later Lt Gen) J.C. Murchie, D.M.O. & I., N.D.H.Q., who expressed the opinion that although the value of the parachute troops in certain situations was very great, the provision of such troops by Canada would be a project of doubtful value to the combined Empire war effort in view of the expenditure of time, money, and equipment which would be involved. Further, having regard to the probable operational roles of the Airborne Forces, it would be likely that any Canadian parachute units would form part of a United Kingdom Parachute Corps, would be difficult to administer and would be largely out of Canadian control during operations. For these reasons Col Murchie did not recommend the formation of a Parachute Battalion, but considered, rather, the the Canadian war effort should be directed towards the maintenance of such commitments as had already been accepted. ‘If any additional commitments are accepted these should be limited to the formation of units to which Canadians are particularly adapted by reason of nature of this country’. (H.Q.S. 8846: Memorandum by D.M.O & I. for D/C.G.S.,August 16 1940).

Canadian-Soldiers

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1st Canadian Parachute Battalion – United Kingdom to France

67Report N°138
Historical Officier
Canadian Military Headquarters

1st Canadian Parachute Battalion
Organization and Training
July 1942 – June 1944

Canada’s first specially trained parachute unit was the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion; it did not have the status of a regiment though is considered a direct predecessor to The Canadian Airborne Regiment. The Battalion was formed during the Second World War and disbanded shortly after; it served concurrently with the 1st Canadian Special Service Battalion, the administrative name for the Canadian component of the First Special Service Force. Unlike its counterpart in the US Army, the 1st Canadian Parachute Battalion was entirely Canadian, and though it had a Canadian commanding officer, was assigned to the 6th British Airborne Division throughout combat employment and thus was not under higher Canadian command.

(1) Background to the Formation of the Unit (November 1940 – July 1942)
(2) Formation and Early Training (July 1942 – July 1943)
(3) Incorporation in the British 6th Airborne Division
(4) Arrival in the United Kingdom (July 28 1943)
(5) Legal Relationship to British Formation
(6) Administrative Arrangements
(7) Training in the United Kingdom (August 1943 – February 1944)
(8) 1st Canadian Parachute Training Company
(9) Mobilization and Preparations for D Day (March 1944 – June 1944)

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