77th Armored Medical Battalion (AAR) 09/44-05/45

Medics-44/45-US-03

77th Medical Battalion Armored
Subject : Unit History
To : Commanding General, 7th Armored Division

September 1944

(Sept 1) found us still bivouacked two miles south of Fismes, France, where we had been since Aug 29. Up to this time the battalion had been most fortunate regarding the number of casualties suffered by our own men and although many of our collecting sections had been under fire upon several occasions, our only casualty due to wounds to this date was still one, T/5 Lukowicz of A Co who was wounded the latter part of Aug. We remained in this present area until Sept 2, at which time we moved 84 miles to an area 1/2 mile north of Blercourt, France, which is located 8 miles West of Verdun, France.

(Sept 5) Lt Schini, our one surplus M.A.C. was transferred to the 17th Tank Battalion as Battalion Surgeon Assistant. The division was given a rest period for the majority of our stay in the area at Blercourt and motor maintenance plus care of personal equipment was stressed.

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US Intelligence : The Failure of December 1944,

On December 16 1944 : Should the German cracks the defenses in the North Shoulder, their forces would be able to surround the 101st Airborne Division and attached units in the Southern Shoulder (Bastogne area), eliminates the US Troops in the Center Shoulder but also cuts the Main Supply Road (Manay – Vielsalm). This would stop not only the US 1st Army but the entire Bradley’s 12th Army Group in the Belgian Ardennes !

Very unhappy German POW (or very happy one - it's just a point of view) sitting atop a Jeep after being captured by the 4th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron somewhere in Belgium, December 1944, during the Battle of the Bulge, the German counter-offensive in the Ardennes Forest.

Very unhappy German POW (or very happy one – it’s just a point of view) sitting atop a Jeep after being captured by the 4th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron somewhere in Belgium during the Battle of the Bulge, the German counter-offensive in the Ardennes Forest.

1 – The Facts
Reported on the actual map (bellow), the Northern Shoulder of the Allies break true Germany forces at the beginning of the Battle of the Bulge (December 16 1944) can be drawn in the following way :

a. the center axis located at the Losheimer Gap
b. the extreme North flank located in Mutzenich – Imgenbroich – Monschau
c. the extreme South, the Luxemburger border at Ouren

2 – North Shoulder – Allied (mainly US)
Allied Side from North to South

– Höfen, Germany, 99th Infantry Division
– Mutzenich, Germany, 9th Infantry Division
– Monschau, Germany, 9th Infantry Division
– Kuchelscheid, Germany, 2nd Infantry Division
– Wallerscheid, Germany, 2nd Infantry Division
– Krinkelt-Rocherath, Belgium, 99th Infantry Division
– Losheim, Germany, 99th Infantry Division
– Lanzerath, Belgium, 99th Infantry Division
– Manderfeld, Belgium, 106th Infantry Division
– Andler, Belgium, 14th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron (Mez)
– Auw, Belgium, 106th Infantry Division
– St Vith, Belgium, 106th Infantry Division + 1 CC (9-AD)
– Ouren, Belgium, 28th Infantry Division
(note : Services Units and Attached Units not included)

1944-11,05neg,Nomeny,France,Eichberger standing beside destroyed German tank

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3-AD France – Belgium – Roetgen (Germany) Jul-Dec 1944

St Jean-de-Daye-07-26-1944

The 3rd Armored Division moved from Somerset through Southampton and Weymouth and debarked across Omaha Beach. After collecting itself and organizing into combat commands, it attacked to seize Villiers-Fossard. Villiers-Fossard, strongly defended by the Germans in thick hedgerow terrain, formed a salient into American lines threatening progress towards Saint-Lô. On Jun 29, CCA, reinforced by elements of the 29th Infantry Division, attacked to reduce this salient. The enemy had zeroed artillery in on road intersections and covered gaps in the hedgerows with machine-guns and anti-tank weapons. The Americans did not yet have many dozer tanks, and had not yet fully integrated infantry and armor. They did have infantry and artillery tightly integrated, however, and improvised squad tactics to move forward in the compartmented terrain. By Jun 30 Villiers-Fossard had fallen, and the American tankers hurriedly absorbed lessons learned.

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