106-ID (1/422), Schlausenbach, December 1944

Operations : 1st Bn, 422nd Infantry Regiment
106th Infantry Division – In the Vicinity of Schlausenbach (GER)
December 10 to December 19 1944

During the period from Sep 1944 to Dec 1944 many changes in the disposition of the troops along the front were made in preparation for continuing the advance to the east. By Dec 9, VIII Corps, First Army had taken over the positions of V Corps along the Schnee Eifel with the mission of conducting an aggressive defense and be prepared to advance on Cologne on order. This was a sector extending from Monschau (Germany), on the extreme north to a point where the Moselle River crosses the Franco-German boundary at the northeast corner of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. This sector comprised a front of approximately 100 miles. Since there had been very little enemy activity, either than minor patrols, and it was known that the Germans were using this sector for indoctrinating green troops to the sounds of battle, it was dubbed the quiet sector. This sector was defended by a Task Force and three infantry divisions abreast. The 2nd Infantry Division on the north occupied a salient in the Siegfried Line along the high wooded Schnee Eifel Ridge. Task Force X was attached to the 2nd Division and occupied a five miles front north of the Schnee Eifel positions and maintained contact with the 99th Infantry Division of V Corps on its left. The 28th Infantry Division defended the center section along the Our River on the right of the 2nd Infantry Division and the 83rd Infantry Division defended the southern part of the sector along the Our River to its confluence with the Moselle River and thence up the Moselle to the boundary between VIII and XX Corps of the Third US Army. The 9th Armored Division, with no combat experience, was in Corps reserve and was rotating its infantry units in division front lines to gain combat experience.

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36-ID (141-IR – 442-RTC – 405-FS) November 1944

Early, I have published the work of Maj Watanabe about the Lost Battalion in the Vosges Mountains in France in October 1944. I found out that the AJAs did a hell of a job. There is just a wrong word used in this entire story : saved ! The 1st Bn, 141st Infantry Regiment, 36th Infantry Division Texas wasn’t saved because it was just relieved from it’s positions in the Trapin de Saules.

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90-ID (1/358), Fort Koenigsmacker, France, November 1944

Operations of the 1st Bn, 358th Infantry, 90th Infantry Division
At Fort Koenigsmacker, North of Thionville, France
9 – 11 November 1944
Rhineland Campaign
(Personal Experience of a Heavy Weapons Company Executive Officer)
Capt Harry W. Barnes

This report covers the operations of the 1st Battalion, 358th Infantry, 90th US Division in the assault and capture of Fort Koenigsmacker, one of the forts of the outer defenses of Metz, north of Thionville, France. The battalion was commanded by Lt Col C. A. Lytle.

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84-ID (K-334), Prummern, November 1944

Operations of K Co, 334th Infantry, 84th Infantry Division
near Prummern, Germany, November 23 – November 24 1944

(Rhineland Campaign)
(Personal Experience of a Company Commander)
Capt Eldridge C. Dudley

INTRODUCTION

This report covers the operations of K Co, 334th Infantry, 84th Infantry Division in the attack on and subsequent withdrawal from fortified positions near Prummern, Germany Nov 23d to Nov 24th 1944 during the November offensive. In order for the reader to fully appreciate its significance, it will be necessary to discuss briefly the main events which preceded this action.

In early June 1944 the Allied Forces of Canada, Great Britain and the United States successfully invaded the northern coast of France. On Aug 15 the Seventh US Army and the French First Army effected a landing on the southern coast of France. Paris was liberated on Aug 28 and by Sept 4, the sorely needed port of Antwerp had fallen. Aachen, the first large German city to be captured, surrendered on Oct 21. Thus, the early part of November found the allied armies poised generally along the line of the German west wall prepared to strike again, this time toward the heart of the enemy homeland.

The 84th Infantry Division left the United States on Sept 20 1944 and by Nov 1, after a brief stay in England, was trekking its way across France destined to join the Ninth US Army for a part in the November offensive. After arriving in the combat zone in the 84th Division was first introduced to combat under the operational control of XXX British Corps (Nov 18-22 1944) for the purpose of eliminating the Geilenkirchen salient’s which lay astride the boundary of the US Ninth and the British 2nd armies.

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101-A/D (401-GIR), December 25 1944

Operations : 1st Plat, B Co, 401st Glider Infantry
101st Airborne Division, Bastogne, Belgium, Dec 25 1944

(Personal Experience of a Platoon Leader)
Capt John T. O’Halloran

In late autumn of 1944, as the Allied Armies approached the formidable defenses of Western Germany, Allied strategy for penetrating these defenses was molded. The Allies would continue the offensive, striking the enemy at the Ruhr and Saar. In carrying out these separate offensive thrusts it would be necessary to hold thinly some sectors of the front in order to build up strength at the attack points. Before this decision was finally consummated, the Allied High Command carefully considered the capabilities of the enemy. It was felt by Gen Dwight D. Eisenhower, Supreme Allied Commander, that before Germany submitted to total defeat she would concentrate her every effort in an attempt to regain the initiative lost with the Allied landings in Normandy. The conclusion reached was that this attempt would, in all probability, be made in the Ardennes sector.

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99-ID Medical Detachment, 1/393d Regiment, December 1944

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Surgeon’s Report – 1/393-IR, 99th Infantry Division – December 1944

December 12
The Aid station, located in the Krinkelter Forest (Krinkelterwald), near the twin villages of Krinkelt-Rocherath, along the German border, (International Highway), in Belgium performed normal duties during the day and at night arranged for the Medical Support of Units of the 1st Battalion engaged in digging in positions forward of the existing line. All company CP’s were visited by Medical Officer during the day. As a result of the work that night two (2) patients, wounded, severe, were evacuated.

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90-ID, Normandy, France, 06/07-1944

90th-ID-St-Jores-France

Headquarters 90th Infantry Division
After Action Report
Introduction

As of June 1 1944, the 90-ID was disposed in marshaling areas as follows : the main body of the Division was stationed in the XXIX District, Western Base Section, located generally north and east of the cities of Cardiff and Newport, Wales. The Division’s residual elements were located at Bournemouth, England while Group A (composed of foot elements of the 1st and 3rd battalions 359-IR and 40 vehicles) was located at Camp Syon Abbey in Devonshire, England, and attached to the 4-ID. The 358-IR was stationed at Camp Llangattock, Wales; the RCT 9 (-) and the 90-Rcn Troop at Camp Court-Y-Gollen, Wales; the RCT 7, 344-FAB, B Co 315-MB, B Co 315-ECB at Camp Chepstow, Wales; and Division Headquarters, Division Artillery Headquarters, 345-FAB, Special Troops at Heath Camp, Cardiff, Wales; and 315-ECB and 315-MB (less 3 Companies) also at Heath Camp. The Division had completed its preparation for overseas movement to the coast of France and was in the midst of loading vehicles aboard motor transport ships.

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84-ID, 171-ECB, Roer River Crossing (Linnich Germany)

Duren-Germany-1944-Building-Bridges

Engineer’s Report of the Roer River crossing at Linnich, Germany
Scope : A report of the planning, preparation, and crossing phases in which the 171st Engineer Combat Bn, XIII Corps, was involved while in direct support of the 84th Infantry Division in its assault crossing of the Roer River at Linnich, Germany. Period covered : Dec 2 1944 to Feb 24 1945; Lt Col Charles R. Keasy
171st Engineer Combat Battalion, Commanding

Linnich-Germany

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