VII Corps, Breaching the Siegfried Line (September 1944)

Bradley-Collins

In the early years of World War Two, the German Army amply demonstrated its ability to exploit victory to the fullest. After the tide had turned against the Germans, it became apparent that they also possessed the more outstanding ability to quickly recover from a defeat before their opponents could thoroughly exploit their success. Less than a month after suffering inapparently decisive defeat in which it was crushed and battered beyond recognition, German 7. Armee established a coherent front line from the Meuse River to the Schnee Eifel Range in September 1944. Committed in this wide arc and supported by a motley conglomeration of last ditch reserves, the army’s remaining elements successfully defended the approaches to the Reich. During its withdrawal from Falaise to the West Wall, the 7. Armee passed through three distinct phases.

    – 7. Armee rout following narrowly averted annihilation in the Falaise Pocket, 7. Armee ceased to exist as an independent organization, 7. Armee shattered remnants were attached to the 5. Panzer Armee until the September 4 1944, 7. Armee was apparently reconstituted under the command of Gen d. Panzertruppen Erich Brandenberger
    – 7. Armee then passed through the phase of delaying action while it reorganized its forces and re-established the semblance of a front line. Despite persistent orders from above to defend every foot of ground, Gen Brandenberger realized that a fairly rapid withdrawal was called for, if his forces were to reach the West Wall ahead of American spearheads
    – delaying action ended officially on September 9 1944 when the the 7. Armee was charged with the defense of the West Wall in the Maastricht – Aachen – Bitburg sectors. Along with the fortifications the army took over all headquarters and troops stationed in this area. Of the the 7. Armee 3 corps, the LXXXI Corps was assigned the northern sector of the West Wall, from Herzogenrath to Düren witch position to Rollesbroich and the Huertgen Forest sector

LXXIV Corps was committed in the center, from Roetgen to Ormont and the 1. SS Panzerkorps was to defend the West Wall in the Schnee Eifel sector, from Ormont to the boundary with the 1. Armee at Diekirch.

Rukzug-1944-01

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USEC, Compass, Plan / Cruchon & Emons, Switzerland, WW-1

Cruchon-&-Emons-Berne-CH-USEC-01

Cruchon & Emons (Berne) Marching Compass (1914-1918) US Engineer Corps
Cruchon & Emons (Paris) Marching Compass (1914-1918) US Engineer Corps
Plan Ltd (Neuchatel) Marching Compass (1914-1918) US Engineer Corps

Plan-Ltd-Neuchatel-CH-USCE-01

I was searching for the Cruchon & Emons (manufactured in Paris, France) but I didn’t found one yet. It is also the same thing for the Compass Carrier (Leather Cases). I keep on alert but as far as yet, no luck.

Manufactured in Paris, France and in Berne, Switzerland by Cruchon & Emons and in Neuchatel, Switzerland by Plan Ltd, this World War One mirror sighting compass was never as well-regarded as the prismatic models. When introduced into US Army service in 1916 (in fact the US Engineer Corps ordered them), this mirror sighting compass was the most accurate marching compass ever fielded by US forces.

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1st Army Antiaircaft Activities, Battle of the Bulge

65

Official US Army War Report
First Army Antiaircraft in the Battle of the Bulge
Personal Experience of an Army AA Staff Officer
Lt Col Paul C. Davis

First Army AA at its peak consisted of 56 battalions; it is therefore manifestly impossible to discuss all AA action with the Army. I shall therefore highlight the battle by discussing only the following pertinent subjects and actions :

    The Liège Diver Belt-(V-1 Defense)
    Army AA in the Ground Role
    AA in the Primary role, which is subdivided into :
    (a) The Air and Airborne Attacks on V and Vll Corps-16 to 20 December
    (b) The Air Attack on Communications Centers West of the Meuse River
    (c) The New Year’s Day Raid

The V-1 Attack

452-AAAA-W-M-Bn

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Raymon Hook : 325/82-A/B, Bulge

bob

Raymon Hook
325th Glider Infantry Regiment
82nd Airborne Division

[…] After manning a defensive position on the German border East of Grossbeek for about a month, alternating one week in the front lines and one week in reserve, we were relieved by the Canadian Troops and moved out on foot and then trucked to a camp near Sissonne, France for refitting and replacements of personnel, which by this time we sorely needed ! On Dec 18, 1944, we were alerted for a move to Belgium to help stop von Rundstedt in the Battle of the Bulge. We were loaded into open-bed semi-trucks. There was standing room only. As we drew closer to Belgium, we were leaning against or laying on top of each other. The cold was terrible ! A few hours after unloading at Werbomont, Belgium, we started marching in the night to take up defensive positions along the Vielsalm, Salmchateau, Joubiéval, Regné highway (RN-89).

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509th Parachute Infantry Battalion, Italy, Nov 1943

509thGeronimoReport
509th Parachute Infantry Battalion
Office of the Battalion Commander
S-3 Journal
November 1943 – Italy
Headquarters
509th Parachute Infantry Battalion
Office of the Battalion Commander

S-3 Journal

November 9 1943
Departed from Naples 1430 by truck convoy. Proceeded via Casserta, Calazzo, Avignans, Dragoni, to Macchia, attached to 504th Prcht Infantry. Arrived at Macchia Nov 10, 0100. Sent into positions around Macchia.

509-History-RoumleyNaples

At the 509th Officers Club in Naples. Back row L-R : Gorshe, Shaw, Berman, Martinez, Pahl, and Kelly. Front : Alden, Tracy, DeLeo, Oldham, and Livingston. (Photo courtesy of Edward R. Reuter)

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5th Armored Division – December 1944

A column of U.S. troops from the 9th Armored Division, an armored car of the headquarters company, moving on winter road

A column of US troops from the 5th Armored Division, an armored car of the headquarters company, moving on a Belgian winter road during the Battle of the Bulge

After Action, December 1944 – (Secret) HQs 5th Armored Division
January 5, 1945, Report After Action Against Enemy – December 1944

Losses in Action
(a)Personnel :

Personnel
Officers
Enlisted men
Total
Killed in Action
9
158
167
Seriously Wounded in Action
4
138
142
Lightly Wounded in Action
42
632
674
Seriously Injured in Action
0
3
3
Lightly Injured in Action
1
83
84
Missing in Action
1
106
107
Total
57
1130
1187

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