7-AD (Appendix) December 1944

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Order of Withdrawal of 7-AD West of Salm River
The following order, published subsequent to Operations Instructions, Hq 7-AD, 230015A Dec 44 (Annex 3) was the final withdrawal order for the 7th Armored Division and attached units)

HQ 7TH ARMD DIV (TAC)
VIELSALM, BELGIUM
230200A DEC 44

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US XIX Corps, Across the Siegfried Line, October 1944

NARA-292569

XIXCorps-US-WW2This study is a General Staff analysis and record of the most important operational details of the XIX Corps’ successful attack on and penetration through the Siegfried Line. This successful attack against the Siegfried Line should be treated largely as a tribute to the superb fighting ability of our infantry and armored soldiers, well supported by artillery and engineers, intelligently led in a well-planned action. It has demonstrated that thorough planning, determined leadership and aggressiveness in battle, can overcome what otherwise seems to be insuperable obstacles. Both, the 30th Infantry Division and the 2nd Armored Division were battle experienced with able leadership throughout their echelons. The 29th Infantry Division, which came in during the latter phases of the operation, was also a battle experienced Division. The 30-ID had been continually in contact with the enemy since its first attack on June 15 1944 on the Vire & Taute Canal (France); it had participated in the breakthrough south of St Lô; and had withstood the German Panzer attack near Mortain in their effort to recapture Avranches. It had fought across France and Belgium, capturing Tournai and Fort Eben Emael; and was the first American unit to enter Holland then entered Germany in September to prepare for this assault on the Siegfried Line. Its Commander, Maj Gen Leland S. Hobbs, had commanded the Division from its initial commitment; its Assistant Division Commander, Artillery Commander, and other higher commanders, were all experienced and battle tried. It was a well-developed team.

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B-17 Bomber Year & Serial (1941)

Here's a fun tribute to the brave airmen of the US Army Air Forces during World War 2 with Elizabeth. The US Army Air Force was the air power might of World War 2, dropping millions of pounds of ordnance over Europe and Japan and changing the tide of the war. Elizabeth is wearing an enlisted Class A uniform and crusher cap, behind her is the famed Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress. Model: Elizabeth Photographer: Britt Dietz © Dietz Dolls: [link]

Here’s a nice Tribute to the Brave Airmen of the WW-2 USAAF
The USAAF was the air power might of World War 2, dropping millions of pounds of ordnance over Europe and Japan and changing the tide of the war. Elizabeth is wearing an enlisted Class A uniform and crusher cap, behind her is the famed Boeing B-17G Flying Fortress.
(Source = Model : Elizabeth; Photographer : Britt Dietz © Dietz Dolls dietzdolls.com)

B-17G Specifications
First flight : July 28, 1935 (prototype)
Model number : 299
Classification : Bomber
Span : 103 feet 9 inches
Length : 74 feet 9 inches
Gross weight : 65,000 pounds
Top speed : 287 mph
Cruising speed : 150 mph
Range (max.) : 3,750 miles
Ceiling : 35,600 feet
Power : Four 1200-horsepower Wright R-1820-97 engines
Accommodation : 2 pilots, bombardier, radio-operator, 5 gunners
Armament : 11 to 13 machine guns, 9,600-pound bomb load

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M-1903 Springfield, .30 (30.06) (Years & Serial)

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What is an M-1903 and Where does it Comes From ?
The 1903 adoption of the Springfield Bolt Action was preceded by nearly 30 years of struggle and politics, using lessons learned from the recently adopted US versions of the Krag-Jørgensen rifle and the German Mauser G-98 bolt-action rifles. The M-1903 not only replaced the various versions of the US Army’s Krag, but also the Lee M-1895 and M-1885 Remington-Lee used by the US Navy and the US Marine Corps, as well as all remaining single shot trap-door Springfield M-1873. While the Krag had been issued in both a long rifle and carbine, the Springfield was issued only as a short 24 in. barrel rifle in keeping with current trends in Germany and Great Britain to eliminate long rifle and carbines.

1903-springfield

(Source : www.warrelics.eu)

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B-17 Bomber Year & Serial (1940)

Badly-Damaged-B-17

The B-17 went through several alterations in each of its design stages and variants. Of the 13 YB-17s ordered for service testing, 12 were used by the 2nd Bomb Group of Langley Field, Virginia, to develop heavy bombing techniques, and the 13th was used for flight testing at the Material Division at Wright Field, Ohio. Experiments on this aircraft led to the use of a turbo-supercharger which would become standard on the B-17 line. A 14th aircraft, the YB-17A, originally destined for ground testing only and upgraded with the turbocharger, was re-designated B-17A after testing had finished. As the production line developed, Boeing engineers continued to improve upon the basic design. To enhance performance at slower speeds, the B-17B was altered to include larger rudder and flaps. The B-17C changed from three bulged, oval shaped machine gun blisters to two flush, oval-shaped machine gun window openings and a single “bathtub” machine gun housing on the lower fuselage, that resembled the similarly-configured and located ventral defensive emplacement on the German Heinkel He 111P-series medium bomber. Models A through D of the B-17 were designed defensively, while the large-tailed B-17E was the first model primarily focused on offensive warfare.

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(Image Source : www.warbirdalley.com)

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