NOTE During the month of July EUCMH is open for readers ! (enjoy)


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26th Infantry Division (2/101-IR) Moyenvic France November 8-10 1944

Operations of the 2nd Battalion, 101st Infantry Regiment, 26th Infantry Division, (Yankee Division), in the Attack of Moyenvic, France, November 8-10 1944, Rhineland Campaign, Personal Experience of a Battalion Operations Officer, Major John O. Dickerson
(Thanks to Miss Nancy Larson-Lenz, USA (Encoding))


Introduction


This archive covers the operations of the 2nd Battalion, 101st Infantry, 26th Division, in the attack on Moyenvic, France, on the initiation of the Third army’s fall offensive, 8-10 November 1944. The XII Corps of the Third Army, spearheaded by the 4th Armored Division, had in mid-September of 1944, taken bridge-heads across the Moselle River east of Nancy, France. Low in supplies, as was the whole Army, they adopted a defensive attitude, and waited for the build-up of supplies that would enable them to go on the offensive. Except for vigorous patrolling and straightening of the line, the lull lasted for nearly two months until November 8 1944 when the attack across the Department of the Meurthe et Moselle jumped off. In this relatively quiet sector, on October 7, elements on the 26th Infantry Division, with which we shall be concerned, relieved elements of the 4th Armored Division, and were committed to their first enemy contact.

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1.SS-Panzer-Division (LSSAH) War Crimes (Memorandum)

Baugnez-15

In the early days of the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP), the leadership realized that a bodyguard unit composed of reliable men was needed. Ernst Julius Günther Röhm (Nov 28 1887 – July 1 1934), a German military officer, a founding member of the NSDAP, a close friend and early ally of Adolf Hitler formed a guard formation from the 19.Granatwerfer-Kompanie. This formation evolved rapidly and became the Sturmabteilung) (SA). In 1923, Hitler ordered the creation of a small separate bodyguard dedicated to his service rather than a suspect mass of the party, such as the SA. Originally the unit was composed of a handful of trusty men like Rudolf Hess, Joseph Berchtold, Emil Maurice, Erhard Heiden, Ulrich Graf, Bruno Gesche, Sepp Dietrich, Christian Webber, Karl Fiehler, Walter Buch and Hermann Fobke commanded by Julius Schreck and Joseph Berchtold. This group was designated the Stabswache, the Staff Guard. The unit was issued unique badges, Schreck resurrected the use of the Totenkopf (skull) as the unit’s insignia, a symbol various elite forces had used in the past, including specialized assault troops of Imperial Germany in World War I who used Hutier infiltration tactics, but at this point the Staff Guard was still under the control of the SA. Later that year, the unit was renamed Stosstrupp Hitler (Shock Troop) and placed under the command of Julius Schreck. The unit never numbered more than 20 members. On November 9 1923, the Stosstrupp, along with the SA and other NSDAP paramilitary units, took part in the abortive Beer Hall Putsch in Munich. In the aftermath of the putsch, Hitler was imprisoned and the NSDAP and all associated formations, including the Stosstrupp, were officially disbanded.
During this period, the mid-1920s, violence remained a large part of the Bavaria politics and Hitler became quickly a potential target. In 1925, he ordered the formation of a new bodyguard unit, the Schutzkommando (protection command). The unit was renamed the Sturmstaffel (assault squadron) and in November was renamed the Schutzstaffel, abbreviated to SS. In 1933, the SS had grown from a small bodyguard unit to a formation of over 50,000 men. The decision was made to form a new bodyguard unit, again called the Stabswache, which was mostly made up of men from the 1.SS-Standarte. In 1933 this unit was placed under the command of Josef ‘Sepp’ Dietrich who selected 117 men to form the SS-Stabswache Berlin on March 17 and this unit replaced the army guards at the Reich Chancellery. Eleven men from the first company of 117 went on to win the Knights Cross, and forty of them were awarded the German Cross in gold for bravery. Later in 1933, two further training units were formed : SS-Sonderkommando Zossen on May 10, and a second unit, designated SS-Sonderkommando Jüterbog on July 8. These were the only SS units to receive military training at that time. On September 3 1933 the two Sonderkommando merged into the SS-Sonderkommando Berlin under Dietrich’s command. In November 1933, on the 10th anniversary of the Beer Hall Putsch, the Sonderkommando took part in the rally and memorial service for the NSDAP members who had been killed during the putsch. During the ceremony, the members of the Sonderkommando swore personal allegiance to Hitler. At the conclusion the unit received a new title, Leibstandarte Adolf Hitler (LAH).

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POW Reports from Sepp Dietricht and Joachim Peiper 1945


The attached files are translations of briefs of the war experiences of (ex) SS-Oberst-Gruppenführer Josef Sepp Dietrich, wartime CG of the 6.SS Panzer-Army, and (ex) SS-Obersturmbannführer Joachim Peiper, wartime CO of the Kampfgruppe Peiper (1.SS-Panzer-Regiment, 1.SS-Panzer-Division LSSAH), written by then for Colonel Burton F. Ellis, trial judge advocate, while they were awaiting trial for the Malmédy Massacre


Schwäbisch Hall
Highly esteemed Lt Colonel,
According to your wishes, I have tried to make up a report about the war years 1939-1945, as I have joined, participated in and seen them. I cannot pass judgment on the outer or inner economic and political events as it did not belong to my field of interest or work, and for seven years I was nearly always at the front outside of Germany. In the hope to have made this report according to your wishes, I remain
Yours respectfully and faithfully
/s/ Sepp Dietrich


Poland


At the outbreak of the war with Poland, the Leibstandarte Adolf Hitler under my leadership as Regimental Commander was assigned to the Wehrmacht becoming a part of the army of Generalfeldmarshall Maximilian von Weichs. The Regiment was committed to the Bzdura sector to the surrounding of Kuhno and the Modlin fortress. With the capitulation of Warsaw, the campaign with Poland was at an end. The troops of both the warring states are to be judged as of the same quality. For this short campaign the equipment and training were quite suitable.

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2nd Infantry Division (9-IR) Heartbreak Crossroads Lt Col Ralph V. Steele


HEARTBREAK CROSSROADS
The following is an eye-witness account of the events leading up to, and details of the Battle of the Bulge from December 11 1944 to January 30 1945 as seen by Lt Col Ralph V. Steele, Executive Officer, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division. After spending several weeks of the winter of 1944 in a defensive position along the Schnee-Eifel range in eastern Belgium, the 9-IR had been relieved on December 11 by elements of the 106th Infantry Division, new to combat. The 9-IR moved north, to the vicinity of Nidrum, to prepare for an attack northeast to the Roer River. I had been the Executive Officer of the 9-IR since a few days after we landed on Omaha Beach in June. Most of us felt quite relieved to get moving again after such a long period of inactivity. Oh, there had been daily patrols, short skirmishes and routine intelligence work, but it was all becoming too routine, and, perhaps, dangerous. As a Regimental Executive Officer, and former Intelligence Officer, I had been fortunate to learn many of the contingency plans and it was now easier for me to grasp the reasoning of the scheme to send the Indian Head Division up to capture the Roer River dams on the Urft chain of lakes to prevent their being blown up to flood the low land below and prevent the allied forces from moving toward Bonn, Cologne and the Rhine River.

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30th Infantry Division (2/119) Maj Hal D. McCown POW Report (Peiper)

Annex #1 to G-2 Periodic Report #192
Observations of an American Field Officer who escaped from the 1.SS-Panzer-Division LSSAH (Kampfruppe Peiper). The following is an account, in his own words, of the experiences of Maj Hal. D. McCown, Commanding Officer of the 2/119-IR (30-ID) who was captured by the armed spearhead of the 1.SS-Panzer-Division (LSSAH) Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler in the vicinity of Stoumont, Belgium, on December 21 1944.

On the afternoon of December 21 1944, at about 1600, I, my radio operator and orderly were captured by a German patrol which had us covered from all sides in a trap; a machine gun fired over our head and individuals from another patrol closed in on us from three directions. At that time I was moving away from the front lines where I had inspected the front line positions of my Battalion which was flanking Stoumont from the German’s rear. I was taken back to the German Command Post at Stoumont and as I passed through the town observed preparations everywhere for departure among the Germans. The German commander later told me that it was the appearance of my troops on his rear in the town that caused him to evacuate during that night. I was taken back to the main headquarters at La Gleize, passing through several areas where fire fights were going on between my men and the surrounded Germans. Knowing my own plans for the capture of Stoumont were being put into effect at that time I was halfway expectant to be recaptured before I reached La Gleize. This was not the case, however. In La Gleize I was taken to the cellar containing the commander of the German troops whose name I later found out was SS-Obersturmbannführer Joachim Peiper, 1.SS-Panzer-Regiment, 1.SS-Panzer-Division. An interpreter (Joseph Becker) who had spent 16 years in Chicago, USA, served as interpreter. I later found out that the majority of German officers spoke English fairly well.

Stoumont, Belgium, December 1944

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November 2015 Army Air Force Photos & Heroes (HD)

Wearing the jacket on display at the National Museum of the US Air Force, Capt (later Col) Edward C. Gleed (right), the 332nd Fighter Group’s operations officer and Lt (later Lt Col) Woodrow W. Crockett (center) plan for a mission in March 1945. Note that Gleed later removed the 15th Air Force emblem from the jacket’s left sleeve. (US Army Air Force Photo)

Col Benjamin O. Davis, Air Base at Rametti, Italy. Benjamin O. Davis Jr (1912-2002) became the USAF’s first African American general officer in 1954 and retired as a lieutenant general in 1970. He received his fourth star in 1998. (US Army Air Force photo)

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18 days ago Comments Off on November 2015 Army Air Force Photos & Heroes (HD) PERMALINK

99th Infantry Division (King Co 394-IR) Elsenborn December 16-21 1944

Operations of King Company, 394th Infantry Regiment, 99th Infantry Division, in Defensive Action near Elsenborn, Belgium, Battle of the Bulge, December 16 – December 21 1944, Ardennes Alsace Campaign. Personal Experience of a Company Commander

Capt Simmons J. Wesley


INTRODUCTION


In mid November 1944, after a hasty trip from England, the 99th Infantry Division relieved element of the 5th Armored Division and the 9th Infantry Division and took over a defensive position in what was considered a quiet sector in the southern part of the V Corps (1st Army) front facing the Siegfried Line. It was this quiet sector that the green 99-ID was to receive its combat indoctrination. However, this sector did not remain quit very long as the German directed their famous counter offensive in this area. This archives covers a portion of that offensive, known as the Battle of the Bulge, and sets forth an account on the defensive operations of King Company, 3/394th Infantry Regiment, 99th Infantry Division during the period of December 16-21 1944.

The progress of the 1st US Army, which had reached the Ardennes Forest in September 1944, is of great significance. So rapid had been the race of American tanks and infantry across France and Belgium that our supplies could not keep pace. In view of the almost exhausted supplies, the Allied High Command decided, rather than to attempt a final thrust to the heart of Germany, to commit all forces on a general line which stretched for nearly 150 miles and hold until supporting troops and supplies arrived to permit a resumption of the offensive. To execute this plan and resume the attack would necessitate the massing of all available forces in the attack sectors. Thus, a decision was made to make substantial withdrawals of troops from the Ardennes sectors, leaving a minimum holding force to maintain the existing line. This obviously, involved a calculated risk, but the Ardennes Forest afforded a natural defensive barrier with few good roads and it was known that the Germans were using this area to rest and refit their battered divisions. During the latter part of October and early November, shifts were made in the Allied lineup. Certain troop units were withdraw from the Ardennes sector leaving the remaining units with wider defensive frontages and larger areas of responsibility. The Roer River was an obstacle which could be made into a dangerous barrier by release of water from dams on its headwaters and upper tributaries. The dams were in the sector of responsibility of the V Corps which was executing plans for their capture with veteran units from the vicinity of Monschau, Germany.

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106th Infantry Division (1/422) Vicinity Schlausenbach – Dec 10-19 1944

Operations of the 1st Battalion, 422nd Infantry Regiment, 106th Infantry Division (Golden Lion), in the Vicinity of Schlausenbach, Germany, December 10 to December 19 1944
Personal Experience of a battalion Executive Officer
Major William P. Moon Jr


Introduction


During the period from Sep 1944 to Dec 1944 many changes in the disposition of the troops along the front were made in preparation for continuing the advance to the east. By December 9, the VIII Corps of the First Army had taken over the positions of the V Corps along the Schnee Eifel with the mission of conducting an aggressive defense and be prepared to advance on Cologne on order. This was a sector extending from Monschau, on the extreme north, to a point where the Moselle River crosses the Franco-German boundary at the northeast corner of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg. This sector comprised a front of approximately 100 miles. Since there had been very little enemy activity, either than minor patrols, and it was known that the Germans were using this sector for indoctrinating green troops to the sounds of battle, it was dubbed the quiet sector. This sector was defended by a Task Force and three infantry divisions abreast. The 2-ID on the north occupied a salient in the Siegfried Line along the high wooded Schnee Eifel Ridge. Task Force X was attached to the 2-ID and occupied a five miles front north of the Schnee Eifel positions and maintained contact with the 99-ID (V Corps) on its left. The 28-ID defended the center section along the Our River on the right of the 2-ID and the 83-ID defended the southern part of the sector along the Our River to its confluence with the Moselle River and thence up the Moselle to the boundary between the VIII and the XX Corps of the Third US Army. The 9-AD, with no combat experience, was in Corps reserve and was rotating its infantry units in division front lines to gain combat experience.

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75th Infantry Division (3/291) Aldringen Belgium January 22 1945 (BOB)

Operations of the 3rd Battalion, 291st Infantry Regiment, 75th Infantry Division, North of the town of Aldringen, Belgium, January 22 1945, during the Battle of the Bulge.
Personal Experience or a Battalion Intelligence Officer
Captain Archie R. Hyrle


INTRODUCTION


This archive covers the operations of the 3rd Battalion, 291st Infantry Regiment of the 75th US Infantry Division, in the combat approach to Aldringen, Belgium, on January 22 1945, during the Ardennes-Alsace Campaign. In order for the reader to have a better understanding of this operation, let us view some of the dominating events directly preceding this campaign.
Since June 6 1944, when the Allies invaded the Normandy Cost of France, they had been able to push steadily forward, and in the space of approximately six months, stood poised on the western frontier of Germany. Morale was high, fighting reduced, supply lines long, weather severe, and that particular phase of the war known as the Ardennes-Alsace Campaign began. On the morning of January 3 1945, we find the allied air forces pounding the German lines of communication, troop and supply concentrations. At the same time the Third Army continued its fighting around Bastogne, Belgium, and the 1st Army began its offensive from the north, the VII Corps leading the attack, the XVIII Airborne Corps on the east and the British XXX Corps on the west. For the next eleven days Gen Hodges’ 1st Army attacking from the north and Gen Patton 3rd Army attacking from the south ground their way steadily forward against a still unbeaten enemy and weather conditions at least as formidable as the enemy. The snow in many cases was two feet deep and practically every move was accompanied by the loss of troops because of frozen hands, feet, or faces. The weather conditions of the 1944-1945 winter in the Belgian Ardennes Forest was the most severe in over sixty years. On January 16 1945, the 1st Army and 3rd Army joined at Houffalize, Belgium, and then executed turns to the left and right respectively and attacked due east. From this time forward in the campaign most units were confronted with the task of fighting a retreating enemy from one road block or ambush to another.

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2nd Infantry Division (1/9-IR) Krinkelt-Rocherath December 17-18 1944

Operations of the 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division, in the Hasty Defense Against German Panzers Forces Attack north of Krinkelt-Rocherath, December 17-18 1944 (Battle of the Bulge) (Personal Experience of a Battalion Executive Officer)
Major William F. Hancock


INTRODUCTION


This archive, covers the operations of the 1st Battalion, 9th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Infantry Division in the defense against the German Counter offensive in December 1944. In order to orient the reader, it will be necessary to discuss briefly some of the major military operations which led up to this action. On June 6 1944, the Allied Armies successfully invaded the continent of Europe and by early December had pushed inland across France and Belgium. The Seventh US Army and the First French Army invaded the southern coast of France on August 15 1944, moved rapidly north and joined the Third US Arm on the German Border. Here, the Allied Armies faced the German Siegfried Line (West Wall). The Siegfried Line consisted of mutually supporting defenses in depth. These defenses were built around reinforced concrete pill boxes. The First US Army prepared plans for the continuation of the attack through the Siegfried Line. The 2nd Infantry Division landed in France on D plus 1 and fought through the hedgerow country of Normandy as part of the V Corps. On August 16 1944, the 2nd Infantry Division was withdrawn from the Normandy fighting and moved to the vicinity of Brest, France to participate in the capture of that city. On September 18 1944, the city of Brest fell and the 2nd Infantry Division was again on the move across France and into Belgium. The division closed into an assembly area in the vicinity of St Vith, Belgium, and prepared to move into a defensive position in the Schnee Eifel region. The division moved into positions into the Schnee Eifel and remained there until December 11. At this time the division was relieved by the 106-ID, and moved to the north to rejoin the V Corps in the vicinity of Elsenborn, Belgium in preparation for the First Army attack through the Siegfried Line.

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9th Infantry Division (2/39-IR) D’Horn Germany – December 4/10 1944

Combat Report
Operations of the 2nd Battalion, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division, in the Attack on D’Horn, Germany, December 4 – 10 1944, Rhineland Campaign. Personal Experience of an assistant member on the Battalion Staff, Captain Arvid P. Croonquist Jr


INTRODUCTION


The action which this archive is to cover; that of the 2nd Battalion, 39th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division during the period December 4-10 1944 as witnessed by an assistant member of the Battalion Staff, brings out several principles and small points concerning matters in planning and execution which ordinarily do not come to light. Usually they are passed over lightly and very few people ever give them a second thought. The attack which actually took place on December 10 was the first of a three day attack period and as far as the majority of men were concerned it was just one of many made by the battalion. Their aim was to get to the little town, which was the objective, alive and in one piece. The officers, had the same idea, only there was more to it because their’s was the problem of giving the men who did the fighting the benefit of their knowledge in the use of various means and aids which were available to assist them in accomplishing this feat. What is referred to in particular here is t he use of tactics, formations, supplies, attachments , and most important of all the use of supporting weapons. It is the last of the items mentioned above that played such a big factor in this particular action. All the others entered into it but this was by far and large the most important; in fact the use of these supporting weapons and attachments is the main lesson to be brought out in this archive.

Field modification to a jeep, manned by T/5 Louis Gergye and Pvt William Jump of I&R Platoon, 60th Infantry Regiment, 9th Infantry Division. Two 2.36 Rocket Launchers ‘bazookas’ have been mounted on a .50 cal. machine gun pedestal mount.

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124-CAV (Able) (Mars Task Force) Nam-Pak-Kha Jan-Feb 1945


CHINA-BURMA-INDIA

Operation of Troop A, 124th Cavalry (Mars Task Force) in the Battle of Nam-Pak-Kha, Jan 28 1945 to Feb 2 1945, Central Burma Campaign, Personal Experience of a Troop CO, Major William A. Locke


Late in February, 1944 the first phase of the Allied Operation for the reconquest of Burma began. The purpose of this Allied offensive was to regain control of the land routes across Burma so that supplies could be transported to China. The enormous tonnage of supplies which were required of the American and British Allies in order to keep China in the war had to be transported vast distances over sea, land and air. With the Japanese controlling all of the sea ports of China, as well as the whole of French Indo-China, Thailand, and Burma, our Chinese Allies were sealed off by land and sea. This threw a tremendous strain on the air force Which attempted to sustain the supply flow until a sea and land route could be reestablished. At the beginning of the campaign related in this archive, supplies were being flown from India, across Burma, and into the interior of China. The objective of this campaign was to drive the enemy out of Burma so that the land and sea routes to China could be opened. This operation was planned in late 1943. At the time there was known to be a total of five Japanese Divisions in Burma. The first phase, which was to be carried out by American and Chinese forces operating from bases in the vicinity of Ledo on the northwest border of Burma, had as its objective the capture of Myitkyina, the northern terminus of the Myitkyina – Mandalay railroad. Accomplishment of this first phase would permit the building of a road from Ledo to the Burma Road, and thus facilitate the overland transportation or supplies to China while succeeding phases or the campaign were being accomplished. At the conclusion or the campaign, supplies could again be brought in by sea to the Port or Rangoon, carried by rail to Lashio and thence over the Burma Road to China as had been the case previous to the occupation of Burma a by the Japanese.

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26th Infantry Division (Yankee Division) History 1944-1945

The 26th Infantry Division, the Yankee Division, has been a famous Division for almost two centuries of American burgeoning and growth. The lineage of the Yankee Division extends back to the beginning of the American citizen soldier – the fighting colonial troops of the early Plymouth and Massachusetts colonies. The 102nd Field Artillery Battalion traces its origin to one of the oldest military organizations in America, the Gloucester Militia. Ancestors of the 101st Engineers unfurled the first American flag on Prospect Hill during the Revolutionary War. Battery A of the 101st Field Artillery was one of the original artillery units in the Army and won fame as Battery Jones during the Civil War in fighting through the Wilderness, Petersburg, Cold Harbor and Richmond. The oldest of the Yankee Division’s three infantry regiments, the 104th, stems back to the Springfield Train Band and Hampshire County Regiments whose troops served through the French and Indian Wars. Their descendants took part in the siege of Boston in 1776 as Minute Men. Later, generations of these New Englanders took part in the War of 1812, and every great American conflict since. The 101st Infantry Regiment was originally designated the Massachusetts 9th Infantry and was first organized from a nucleus of Boston fighting Irishmen in 1861, during the Civil War. They played their pipes at Manassas, sounded the charge at Antietam and Chanchellorsville and sang Garryowen in Glory at Mechanicsville as, heavily outnumbered, they held off Stonewall Jackson’s men. During the Spanish American War they again took to the field at Santiago. Such was the background of part of the troops that made up the New England National Guards on the eve of the First World War. Most of these units were on the Mexican Border, during the trouble with Mexico in 1916. On August 13 1917, after the United States declared war on Germany, their ranks were augmented and together they formed the 26th Infantry Division.

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26th Infantry Division, Charlie-101, Saarlautern, James C. Haahr

Saarlautern, James C. Haahr, Charlie Co, 101-IR, 26-ID

While the Yankee Division veterans remember Saarlautern and the immediate area for many reasons, the severe fighting that preceded the Yankee Division’s commitment to the actions in Saarlautern may not be familiar to YDers. This archive provides a brief summary of the actions that preceded the Yankee Division’s move to the control of the XX Corps and its eventual relief of the 95th Infantry Division in the Saarlautern bridgehead. I have also included some of the things that I remember most vividly in the bridgehead when serving with the 2nd Plat., Charlie Co, 101-IR. All three regiments of the 26-ID alternated duty in the bridgehead broken by periods in reserve, and the 104-IR was the first regiment to move into the bridgehead together with the 2/328-IR on January 28 1945. At that time, the 101-ID moved into the Hargarten-Falk area as Division reserve.

Jagdpanther destroyed by an American M-36 Jackson near Hargarten, 1945.

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German Special Operations in the 1944 Ardennes Offensive

German Special Operations in the 1944 Ardennes Offensive
Major Jeffrey Jarkowsky, USA


Setting the Stages


I have just made a momentous decision. I shall go over to the counter attack, that is to say here, out of the Ardennes, with the objective Antwerp ! With a sweep of his hand, Adolf Hitler had just laid the foundation for the German counter offensive that would become more known as the Battle of the Bulge. The German generals and field-marshals surrounding the large situation map in the Fuehrer Headquarters war-room were momentarily stunned, and with good reason. Assembled at Hitler’s military headquarters, the Wolf’s Lair, they had only moments before heard the all too familiar litany of reverses and losses briefed by Generaloberst Alfred Jodl, the Oberkommando der Wehrmacht (OKW) Chief of Staff. The fortunes of war were not looking favorable for Germany on September 16 1944. Strategically, the Germans were on the run. The Allied advance across western Europe following the breakout in Normandy had carried right to the vaunted West Wall defenses of Germany’s border. American units had already penetrated on to German soil near Aachen. On the Russian front, the Soviet summer offensive had crossed into East Prussia. Allied bombing was crippling German industry and devastating her cities.

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5307 Merrill’s Marauders 1st Battalion – Medical Detachment – 01-1944

CODE : GALAHAD
Headquarters 5307 Composite Regiment Provisional
APO 884 New York NY
January 1944
Special Order #3
From 1688-A to 1/5307 Comp Regt (Prov)
Activation Roster
1st Battalion, 5307th Comp Regt (Prov)
Medical Detachment

Medical Detachment, 1/5307

Officers

Major Schudmak Melvin A., # 0-357424, (Medical Corps)
Capt Closuit Frederick C., # 0-410845, (Medical Corps)
Capt McLaughlin John J., # 0-398103, (Medical Corps)
1/Lt Steinfield Winton, (NMI), # 0-474199, (Medical Corps)
1/Lt Smith Phillip E., # 0-1765506, (Veterinary Corps)

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