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(Militaria) Bullion – Hand Made (Theater) CBI Patches and Cool Prices

Working with my friend Claude on this, we want to offer a possibility for Hard to Find or Patch Collectors and even History Fans to be able to acquire patches that are, in not impossible to find, pretty hard to find if you plan to invest a lot of money. What we offer is simple, like the Wartime Patches Theater Made, also Hand-Made with Gold and Silver Treads, and beautiful. Take a look bellow and you will see what I am talking about. These Patches are also the best ones to fits inside a Shadow Boxe.



VMF-124 SQUADRON

This was a fighter squadron formed on September 2 1942 and fully operational by December that year. They arrived in Guadalcanal on February 12, 1943 and were part of the Pacific Theater of WWII in the Solomon Islands. The first F-4U Pilot to be decorated with the Medal of Honor came from the VMF-124 squadron.

Size : W 4 1/2″ x H 3 1/2″
Hand embroidered with gold and silver wire bullion on a black wool felt background
Price : 25 € including the shipping costs.
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XIX Corps Engineers – European Theater of Operations 1944-1945

The German Army is totally defeated. Now, immediately thereafter, a brief history of the XIX Corps Engineers has been assembled. The past eleven months of combat are in the too recent past to view with great perspective. This report attempts to record factual data with little comment. It is felt that the record of the Engineers of this Corps will be enhanced through close examination. Their record of achievement is solid; group planning has been sound, always reliable, sometimes brilliant; execution has he en aggressive; individual acts of heroism have been numerous; team work with the other arms has been outstanding. From the viewpoint of Corps Engineer I would like to record that cooperation and mutual support within the Corps General and Special Staff Sections and the other Corps troops have been uniformly superior. I doubt if Corps Engineers ever have been given a finer opportunity to fit into their proper place in a combat team. The records of every Group, Battalion and Company speak for themselves. They are filled with commendations, citations and reports of missions accomplished. The men who actually did the job themselves have my unlimited praise. Every man in the XIX Corps Engineers can justly be proud of his organization and the part it played in the defeat of Germany.

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26th Infantry Division – Charlie Co – 101st Infantry Regiment – Ottweiler

James ‘Jim’ Haahr
T/Sgt, Charlie Company, 101st Infantry
26th Infantry Division – Yankee Division

After leaving Saarlautern, the Division moved east and southeast in mid-March in the Saarland. Movements were done frequently by truck and tanks when possible, supported ahead by two task forces. Resistance was light as the task forces with armor rolled through villages in which most of the population that remained hung white bed sheets from windows. A path through the concrete dragon teeth of the anti-tank barrier, which stretched to each side for many miles, had been blown by engineers to allow easy passage for tanks with infantry aboard and other support vehicles. With that accomplished, continuous movement with armor or vehicles was interrupted sporadically, and mostly briefly, by small arms fire which required some minimal response from us. Anything more than that could be a difficult job. The tanks and trucks, if the latter were close, had to use winches to pull larger tree trunks felled across a road by explosive charges. Even more care had to be taken to locate, remove or explode safely booby traps which in many cases were within the tangle of branches and tree trunks. Other road blocks were more difficult to get around or through only because of the numeric strength of the defenders or their refusal to fade away or surrender or both. But on we went using whatever was required to take care of the problem.

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26th Infantry Division (2/101-IR) Moyenvic France November 8-10 1944

Operations of the 2nd Battalion, 101st Infantry Regiment, 26th Infantry Division, (Yankee Division), in the Attack of Moyenvic, France, November 8-10 1944, Rhineland Campaign, Personal Experience of a Battalion Operations Officer, Major John O. Dickerson
(Thanks to Miss Nancy Larson-Lenz, USA (Encoding))


Introduction


This archive covers the operations of the 2nd Battalion, 101st Infantry, 26th Division, in the attack on Moyenvic, France, on the initiation of the Third army’s fall offensive, 8-10 November 1944. The XII Corps of the Third Army, spearheaded by the 4th Armored Division, had in mid-September of 1944, taken bridge-heads across the Moselle River east of Nancy, France. Low in supplies, as was the whole Army, they adopted a defensive attitude, and waited for the build-up of supplies that would enable them to go on the offensive. Except for vigorous patrolling and straightening of the line, the lull lasted for nearly two months until November 8 1944 when the attack across the Department of the Meurthe et Moselle jumped off. In this relatively quiet sector, on October 7, elements on the 26th Infantry Division, with which we shall be concerned, relieved elements of the 4th Armored Division, and were committed to their first enemy contact.

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30th Infantry Division (2/119) Maj Hal D. McCown POW Report (Peiper)

Annex #1 to G-2 Periodic Report #192
Observations of an American Field Officer who escaped from the 1.SS-Panzer-Division LSSAH (Kampfruppe Peiper). The following is an account, in his own words, of the experiences of Maj Hal. D. McCown, Commanding Officer of the 2/119-IR (30-ID) who was captured by the armed spearhead of the 1.SS-Panzer-Division (LSSAH) Leibstandarte SS Adolf Hitler in the vicinity of Stoumont, Belgium, on December 21 1944.

On the afternoon of December 21 1944, at about 1600, I, my radio operator and orderly were captured by a German patrol which had us covered from all sides in a trap; a machine gun fired over our head and individuals from another patrol closed in on us from three directions. At that time I was moving away from the front lines where I had inspected the front line positions of my Battalion which was flanking Stoumont from the German’s rear. I was taken back to the German Command Post at Stoumont and as I passed through the town observed preparations everywhere for departure among the Germans. The German commander later told me that it was the appearance of my troops on his rear in the town that caused him to evacuate during that night. I was taken back to the main headquarters at La Gleize, passing through several areas where fire fights were going on between my men and the surrounded Germans. Knowing my own plans for the capture of Stoumont were being put into effect at that time I was halfway expectant to be recaptured before I reached La Gleize. This was not the case, however. In La Gleize I was taken to the cellar containing the commander of the German troops whose name I later found out was SS-Obersturmbannführer Joachim Peiper, 1.SS-Panzer-Regiment, 1.SS-Panzer-Division. An interpreter (Joseph Becker) who had spent 16 years in Chicago, USA, served as interpreter. I later found out that the majority of German officers spoke English fairly well.

Stoumont, Belgium, December 1944

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